When Will I Ovulate?

Knowing your menstrual cycle is extremely important for couples trying to conceive (TTC). The important question you need to ask yourself is, “ When will I ovulate? ”. Once you know this date, you can work out when you are most fertile and should start trying to conceive or indeed wear protection, depending on your goal. However, finding your ovulation can be difficult, especially if you have irregular cycles. In this blog post we wanted to explain how Natural Cycles can be a useful tool to track fertility and stay on top of cycle variations.

Let’s start with the basics.

Ovulation day is when an egg is released from the ovary and is available to be fertilised by a sperm. As sperm can survive inside of you for up to 5 days this creates a 6 day fertile window, which is the period a woman can get pregnant. However, the likelihood of becoming pregnant is dramatically increased if you have intercourse in the three days leading up to and including ovulation. If a woman has sex on any of these three days, she has a 27-33% chance of becoming pregnant [REF: Wilcox, A.J. et al. NEJM (1995) 333:1517].

When will I ovulate?

Calendar view: If you are using Natural Cycles to plan a pregnancy, your highest fertility and the best time to get pregnant will be shown with darker red circles.

 

A good first step to get to know your cycles and find your fertile period is to know how long it is on average.  Day one is the first day of the menstrual period and the last day is the day before the next period begins. A general rule is the longer your cycle is, the later your ovulation day will be. For instance, my cycle is long with 33 days between periods with an average ovulation day of CD 21, which means my most fertile days are CD 19, 20 and 21. If you have shorter cycle, say 21 days between periods, ovulation is likely to happen on CD 7 and your highest chance of getting pregnant will be on CD 5, 6, and 7.

However, these days are never set, especially for us irregular ladies. Have you ever noticed your period coming earlier or later than usual? Or ever wondered why your pregnancy test is negative even though you have no period? Well, it’s because a woman’s follicular phase, the first half of your cycle before ovulation, is often variable – my follicular phase can vary up to 6 days! What this all means is that your ovulation day can differ from cycle to cycle, which is why it is good to keep track with an ovulation app, like Natural Cycles. With a clear rise in temperature and a positive ovulation test (optional), ovulation can be confirmed and your fertile window is mapped for your upcoming cycle, which are indicated by red days. TIP: It is important to measure as much as possible in the week leading up to ovulation to ensure that we capture any variations!

 

Another popular question women ask about their cycles is, “When will I have my period?” or “When should I take a pregnancy test?”

Let’s review the second half of the cycle: The Luteal Phase.

This is the infertile stage of your cycle and is pretty consistent (usually around 12 to 14 days). This means it is a useful menstrual cycle characteristic that can be used to determine when you are likely to get your period, which is approx. 2 weeks after ovulation. However, you should know that the length of the luteal phase can also be quite individual and can vary between 6 and 18 days, so you should never assume that your ovulation day was two weeks prior to this. Instead it is much safer to calculate ovulation with reliable fertility indicators, such as temperature and ovulation prediction kits (OPKs), like we do.

 

 

Period tracker

Once Natural Cycles has detected your ovulation day it can accurately determine when your next period is due so you can keep calm and carry on!

Period trackers, which are based on the rhythm method, assume you are regular. Their primary goal is to let you know approximately when you can expect your next period, which will be around the same time each month as they do not detect ovulation or variations from your data. However, Natural Cycles, gets to know and adapts to your cycle no matter what shape or size it is, calculating your unique ovulation day each cycle giving you an accurate idea of when your period will come (variations included) each month.

At the end of your Luteal Phase, when you get your period, your temperatures will drop down again and the app will let you know a new cycle begins!


When will I ovulate and get my period?

 

 

Pregnancy tracker – plan users

Women usually take a pregnancy test from the first day of their missed period but not many know that the earliest point a woman can take a test is after the egg has been implanted in the endometrium at around day 9. It is fairly easy to recognise when you are pregnant if you are regular and know when your period is due but as mentioned before, if you are not, your period date could vary according to the length of your follicular or luteal phase each cycle.

Natural Cycles is a great tool for women that are planning a pregnancy, as it can determine from your data whether or not you have become pregnant! At the end of your Luteal Phase, if you don’t get your period and your temperature remains high (above the cover line) – the app will recommend that you take a pregnancy test to confirm it’s true.

 

Pregnant

 

If this is the case and you are pregnant, your temperature data entry dots will turn blue on your cycles chart.

When will I ovulate?

Chart view: If your temperature stays elevated at the end of your luteal phase it means you might be pregnant and should take a pregnancy test to confirm. Blue dots indicate that you are pregnant.

 

As part of fertility awareness week, our next blog post we will talk about how fertility tracking can help you understand your reproductive health. Ask yourself, does your period come too often or maybe it doesn’t come at all? Find out answers next week or if you want to know sooner please get in touch with support@naturalcycles.com or visit ask.naturalcycles.com

Yours naturally,

The Natural Cycles team

xx

NaturalCycles iOS App submitted

Hi everyone!

Today we finally submitted our NaturalCycles iOS app for approval for being released for iPhones and iPads in the Apple Store.

The procedure to submit an app to Apple is quite extensive, with many configurations to set and certificates to create. That’s why we are so happy today that we’ve completed all of this work, which not to forget also includes developing the app itself. Now comes the real review process on the Apple side, which can take up to 6 weeks.

Our app has the same structure as the NaturalCycles website for the logged in user – it is different for NC Free, Prevention and Planning. The app itself is free, but one needs to register for a NaturalCycles account to use it, either on the app itself or on NaturalCycles.com. Similar to our website, the whole app changes its color scheme depending on whether you are having a red (fertile) or green (not fertile) day or if you are pregnant, which is when everything becomes blue.

iOS App - NaturalCycles

iOS App - NaturalCycles

iOS App - NaturalCycles

iOS App - NaturalCycles

In addition to the fertility calendar and temperature chart, the app also has the analytics summary of your cycle and a pregnancy tracker if you are pregnant. It also contains Prevention and Planning discussion forums, where you can chat with other users and share your charts, etc.

I think the app is a very nice addition to our website, since NaturalCycles is something you use on a daily basis and not everyone sits in front of a computer all the time, like I do. The app is made with a cross-browser framework called PhoneGap, such that it works for all device dimensions and should be easy to duplicate also to other platforms. Hopefully the Android app will not come long after the iOS app.