Alcohol and your temperature

Going out for a few drinks at the weekend? Here’s what you should know about alcohol and your temperature.

How alcohol affects your temperature

When it comes to Natural Cycles your temperature is the main indicator the algorithm takes into account to calculate your result. Alcohol can cause your temperature to rise, which could end up skewing your data. If your temperature is fluctuating, the algorithm will detect it, and it can result in more red days. And we don’t want that now do we? 

When it’s time to skip measuring

That’s why it’s good to know when it’s time to skip measuring. If you’ve slept poorly or got up during the night many times, you should skip measuring. Also If you have hangover symptoms after drinking alcohol like: feeling sick, a headache or feeling groggy the next day, best leave it be.

Situations when you can still measure, despite the wine.

If you had a glass of wine or two over dinner, you probably won’t feel it the next day (depending on how often you drink etc.)  So you can log your temperature as ‘Normal’, if you don’t have any signs of a hangover.

Here at Natural Cycles, we’re no party poopers, everyone has a glass of wine or more every now and then – especially at the weekend. Just remember to skip on these days 😉

 

Your Natural Cycles Team

How your cycle can affect your skin

Us ladies don’t always have it easy do we? Along with hormonal changes, mood swings, PMS and periods – turns out your skin tends to change over the course of your cycle too. This goes hand in hand with your monthly menstrual cycle and changes in hormones.

You might have already noticed some of these changes, but here’s a complete guide on what you might expect during the different phases of your cycle and how you can adapt your skin care a little to help compensate these changes. Of course everyone is different but you can take notes in the Natural Cycles app to keep track of changes and maybe even tweak your skin care routine.

skin

Period: skin is dry

In the beginning of your cycle, which starts on the first day of your period (Cycle Day 1), your levels of both progesterone and estrogen are quite low. This can cause skin to feel drier and wrinkles might become more obvious.

Tip: Pamper your skin, use gently cleansers and products designed to plump and hydrate your skin.

Follicular phase: skin is stronger

Your ovaries resume the production of estrogen as your period ends, which plumps the skin and encourages collagen production. This gives your skin strength and it will look very plump and healthy. In fact, your skin is not as sensitive to pain during this time.

Tip: Carry out hair removal or skin peelings for dry skin patches during this time.

Ovulation: skin is healthy and plump

This is often the time of the month where you are at your best. You feel great and your skin is healthy and plump. Increased estrogen means collagen is high but it can also lead to some pimples for some women as spots in your skin can get oilier.

Tip: If your gonna get some passport photos taken, do it now 😉

Luteal Phase: skin is oily and prone to break out

Once you ovulate, your body starts producing the hormone progesterone. Which we know to cause the temperature rise and helps the app detect ovulation. Progesterone also stimulates the production of sebum, which is a thick and oily substance that acts a natural skin lubricant. Which can ultimately also cause pores to clog up and be the cause of breakouts.

Tip: Soak up excess oil on the skin surface with a purifying and detoxifying mask.

PMS: skin is puffy

Some women tend to retain water during this time and skin looks puffier. Also because you tend to crave junk food and sugary treats your skin might suffer.

Tip: Do your best to stick to healthy foods and keep water intake high.

 

Have you noticed any changes in your skin throughout your cycle, any tips and tricks to tackle them? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

 

http://www.dermalinstitute.com/uk/library/76_article_Hormones_and_Your_Skin.html

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/acne/features/period#1

http://www.empowher.com/skin-hair-amp-nails/content/5-ways-your-period-affects-your-skin?page=0,0

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16433679

http://www.refinery29.com/period-skin-care